NEM Risk Bulletin

Change has risks

The latest insights into the National Electricity Market

Liddell ultimatum: good cop or bad cop?

The Morrison government yesterday issued Australia’s energy sector with an ultimatum: build 1000MW of new dispatchable capacity before the Liddell coal power station closes in 2023 or we’ll build it ourselves. It’s a Category A political threat designed to split the Labor opposition over gas,

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Four legs good, two legs bad

Good governance stems from the notion of accountability: that no matter where an agent sits in the system, they are effectively held to account by others: the staff by management, management by the CEO, the CEO by the Board, the Board by shareholders and governments

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Going once, going twice… sold to the ACT

The ACT has gone back to the market to top up its renewable offsets. As the population and its energy use grows, new contracts were required to keep up with its much-vaunted 100% renewables policy. The ACT has managed to prove this blog wrong (probably

Read More »

Minimum demand season: a killing field for old coal

Welcome to springtime, or as it’s known by the electricity industry, minimum demand season. Every spring the National Electricity Market returns with megawatts of new solar and wind. The resulting mega-squeezing of other generators is what helps put the oldest and frailest coal power stations

Read More »

Liddell ultimatum: good cop or bad cop?

The Morrison government yesterday issued Australia’s energy sector with an ultimatum: build 1000MW of new dispatchable capacity before the Liddell coal power station closes in 2023 or we’ll build it ourselves. It’s a Category A political threat designed to split the Labor opposition over gas,

Read More »

Four legs good, two legs bad

Good governance stems from the notion of accountability: that no matter where an agent sits in the system, they are effectively held to account by others: the staff by management, management by the CEO, the CEO by the Board, the Board by shareholders and governments

Read More »

Going once, going twice… sold to the ACT

The ACT has gone back to the market to top up its renewable offsets. As the population and its energy use grows, new contracts were required to keep up with its much-vaunted 100% renewables policy. The ACT has managed to prove this blog wrong (probably

Read More »

Minimum demand season: a killing field for old coal

Welcome to springtime, or as it’s known by the electricity industry, minimum demand season. Every spring the National Electricity Market returns with megawatts of new solar and wind. The resulting mega-squeezing of other generators is what helps put the oldest and frailest coal power stations

Read More »

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NEM Risk Bulletin provides expert insight into the transformation of the National Electricity Market (NEM). It is a subscription service designed for businesses, agencies and investors, providing accurate, informed weekly bulletins backed by a comprehensive database of briefing papers covering the breadth of electricity market reform. NEM Risk Bulletin is backed by technical expertise and deep industry knowledge that will guide you through the complex maze of agencies, systems, markets and technologies. Subscribe today!

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About

NEM Risk Bulletin provides concise, accurate and no-nonsense insights into the unruly transformation of Australia’s National Electricity Market (NEM). The Bulletin’s editorial team has a defining core value: the objective of electricity market reform should be to deliver timely  emissions reductions while maintaining a reliable system for  the lowest possible cost.

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Blackout

by Matthew Warren

For 20 years Australia has been in political denial about the seismic changes occurring in the way we power our country. Successive governments continue to tell people that power prices will fall while the lights stay on. Blackout charts the history of electricity in Australia and the world, its collision course with climate change and explains the decade of political chaos and technical decline that has ensued. By understanding  how we got into this mess, it proposes a pathway forward to a reliable, affordable and sustainable electricity system.