NEM Risk Bulletin

Change has risks

The latest insights into the National Electricity Market

Who pays for new transmission?

There’s one, unavoidable, simple rule in business life: someone has to pay for it. Every solar farm, power station, smart meter or transmission line has to be paid for by someone. Either consumers or taxpayers. Nothing is free. The current Grand Designs blueprint for the

Read More »

Renewables gathering pace

The Clean Energy Regulator has provided its monthly update on renewables progress in Australia. An anaemic 3MW of new accredited projects in September appears to be a temporary lull likely affected by COVID constraints on construction and similar activities. In the two prospective categories of

Read More »

The storage wars cometh

Electricity has hosted some of the biggest technology rivalries in modern history: Edison and direct current vs Tesla and alternating current, Gates and Microsoft vs Jobs and Apple. Now the stage is set for the latest duel between bitter rivals: Yu and hydrogen versus Musk

Read More »

Capital punishment

One of the key reforms arising from the Finkel review was the introduction of the integrated system plan (ISP). By mapping out some plausible scenarios for changes in electricity use and the generation mix over the next few decades, the market operator (AEMO) was able

Read More »

Thinking about our winters of discontent in the 2050s

The debate around the cost, viability and regulatory framework that decides on new transmission investment is hitting a nerve. And that is because it touches upon much deeper issues for the future of the electricity system. The decision on how much and whether to proceed

Read More »

A tale of two coal plants

This morning’s news showed the contrasting fortunes of two of the NEM’s coal plant owners. While Trevor St Baker’s Delta was celebrating the Morrison government’s largesse in supporting an upgrade of his Vales Point coal plant in NSW, the AGL Board was nursing a black

Read More »

Who pays for new transmission?

There’s one, unavoidable, simple rule in business life: someone has to pay for it. Every solar farm, power station, smart meter or transmission line has to be paid for by someone. Either consumers or taxpayers. Nothing is free. The current Grand Designs blueprint for the

Read More »

Renewables gathering pace

The Clean Energy Regulator has provided its monthly update on renewables progress in Australia. An anaemic 3MW of new accredited projects in September appears to be a temporary lull likely affected by COVID constraints on construction and similar activities. In the two prospective categories of

Read More »

The storage wars cometh

Electricity has hosted some of the biggest technology rivalries in modern history: Edison and direct current vs Tesla and alternating current, Gates and Microsoft vs Jobs and Apple. Now the stage is set for the latest duel between bitter rivals: Yu and hydrogen versus Musk

Read More »

Capital punishment

One of the key reforms arising from the Finkel review was the introduction of the integrated system plan (ISP). By mapping out some plausible scenarios for changes in electricity use and the generation mix over the next few decades, the market operator (AEMO) was able

Read More »

Thinking about our winters of discontent in the 2050s

The debate around the cost, viability and regulatory framework that decides on new transmission investment is hitting a nerve. And that is because it touches upon much deeper issues for the future of the electricity system. The decision on how much and whether to proceed

Read More »

A tale of two coal plants

This morning’s news showed the contrasting fortunes of two of the NEM’s coal plant owners. While Trevor St Baker’s Delta was celebrating the Morrison government’s largesse in supporting an upgrade of his Vales Point coal plant in NSW, the AGL Board was nursing a black

Read More »

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NEM Risk Bulletin provides expert insight into the transformation of the National Electricity Market (NEM). It is a subscription service designed for businesses, agencies and investors, providing accurate, informed weekly bulletins backed by a comprehensive database of briefing papers covering the breadth of electricity market reform. NEM Risk Bulletin is backed by technical expertise and deep industry knowledge that will guide you through the complex maze of agencies, systems, markets and technologies. Subscribe today!

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About

NEM Risk Bulletin provides concise, accurate and no-nonsense insights into the unruly transformation of Australia’s National Electricity Market (NEM). The Bulletin’s editorial team has a defining core value: the objective of electricity market reform should be to deliver timely  emissions reductions while maintaining a reliable system for  the lowest possible cost.

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Blackout

by Matthew Warren

For 20 years Australia has been in political denial about the seismic changes occurring in the way we power our country. Successive governments continue to tell people that power prices will fall while the lights stay on. Blackout charts the history of electricity in Australia and the world, its collision course with climate change and explains the decade of political chaos and technical decline that has ensued. By understanding  how we got into this mess, it proposes a pathway forward to a reliable, affordable and sustainable electricity system.